You May Be An Unsuspecting Member Of Attachment Parenting

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Every type of parenting has stereotypes to it that no one wants to admit to, whether you are a free-range parent, authoritarian, permissive parent, or one of the many other types.

I mean, don’t put me in a box, right?!

But if you find yourself with a baby strapped to you, while you are researching what that new bump on your son’s knee is before snuggling into your family bed together, then surprise, you may be an Attachment Parent.

Based on your experiences, and other factors that make up the complexity of why we do what we do, we tend to gravitate toward a particular parenting style.

Although we may all have our individualistic twists on the way we operate with our children, stereotypes do exist for a reason.

So, what is attachment parenting? Web Md describes it as such:

Attachment parenting focuses on the nurturing connection that parents can develop with their children. That nurturing connection is viewed as the ideal way to raise secure, independent, and empathetic children.. They make the case that a secure, trusting attachment to parents during childhood forms the basis for secure relationships and independence as adults.”

Basically, it is the opposite of approaches like the Ferber Method, where you leave a child in the crib to cry themselves to sleep.

The first few months of infancy, known as the fourth trimester, are the most vital for establishing a secure baby, as Mommy Underground has previously reported.

In attachment parenting it is important, especially in the first few months of life, to keep our baby close to us in order to efficiently cater to their needs in a timely manner.

When you subscribe to this method, there are some stereotypes that you will slide right into like butter before you even know it.

After reading these character traits of an attachment parent, you will know right off the bat if it’s you we are talking about, laughing out loud as you relate. And there is no shame in this fun and attentive style.

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